Unacceptable KLIA Aerotrain Service Standards

The Kuala Lumpur International Airport (KLIA) Aerotrain is, according to the initial airport design, the only way to get between Satellite Terminal and Main Terminal Building. It is the backbone of KLIA as the Aerotrain is needed to shuttle passengers from the plane in the Satellite Terminal to where all main activities before and after the flight takes place at the Main Terminal Building including check-in, immigration and baggage reclaim. Simply put, for most international flights, all airport-ish activities are done in the Main Terminal Building, and the plane will be parked at the Satellite Terminal, necessitating the travel between the two buildings whether the passenger likes it or not.

If there is a way for things to easily screw up this simple but compulsory passenger experience, it’s by running the Aerotrain, the only way* to get between the two terminals, on limited services – and that’s what seems to be happening in KLIA on a regular basis.

*There are shuttle buses as an interim solution, but read on.

Landing into KLIA and with the plane parked at the Satellite Building, I needed to get the Aerotrain to the Main Terminal Building in order to clear immigration and get out of the airport.

Arriving at the Aerotrain platform, I was greeted with this.

Only one train was in operation, and the crowd was building up quickly at the Aerotrain platform with the multiple arriving flights.

Moving forward all the way to the front door didn’t help the situation either.

I had wanted to just head down to the bus platform to find if there were shuttle buses to the Main Terminal Building instead, but the train pulled in just as I was about to go down to the escalators.

Should I get a bus which I’m not sure if there will be services on that day (I had wanted to try it on a previous trip but it was not available), and add in additional unknown minutes of waiting for the bus and a longer journey time, or should I just squeeze into the train and get to the Main Terminal Building in 2.5 minutes?

The answer was obvious. Train it is.

The other train was parked at the opposite platform with a queue line over the platform screen doors stating “Maintenance in Progress”.

Moving into the train was a rather slow process, but I’d say these are due to the passengers rather than the design of the Aerotrain system.

I managed to get on the train as the last person through the doors just in time before they closed suddenly without any announcement, audio or visual. Also, the air-conditioning was almost non-existent.

It felt as though I was on the KTM Komuter to Mid Valley from KL Sentral in 2012 instead.

This is the part where I got really pissed off with KLIA after stepping off the crowded train.

The KLIA Aerotrain operates with the Spanish Solution for all stations whereby passengers exit from one side of the train and enter from the other. The doors on the exit side opened first, and due to the crowd, and my body on the entrance door, I did not get out of that side in time before the entry side doors opened. As there were no crowds on the entry side, I decided to just step out of the train on that side and be on my way down to immigration. However, I was stopped by a KLIA staff who said that I could not exit by here and needed to go around the other side as shown in the train. I explained that the train is very crowded and I couldn’t see any signs saying that exit was only on that side. And then came her classic reply, “Even if you don’t see, you also must exit one side.” which to me felt like some logic was missing from that sentence. Do note that there are no gated areas on both platforms. But at least she did not force be to reenter the train and exit from the other side, only to loop back to the same point where she stopped me again.

To KLIA’s credit, there is actually a sign for the exit side of the train. Here’s a picture which I took on my return trip.

This is the sign for the way out of the train.

Wait, you can’t see it? I promise you, it’s actually there.

Here, let me increase the contrast and backlight by a ton for you.

Voilà~

The actual exit sign above the exit door of the train.

And this is the entry side of things. However, even if I were to have roamed my eyes around during the train journey, I wouldn’t have seen this as I was right below this sign, unable to turn much of my head around anyway due to the crowds.

I believe that the sign is supposed to be lit up when the train is at the station, so that people can actually read the words clearly. However, it was probably down, along with the air-conditioning and the in-train announcements.

If KLIA can’t even get people between the plane and immigration efficiently, which is getting more and more frequent nowadays, it’s not very difficult to understand why KLIA has dropped a whopping 10 spots down to #44 in just one year in the Skytrax World’s Top 100 Airports of 2018.

An international airport is typically the first impression that visitors to a country get the moment they step off the plane. I didn’t expect KLIA to portray the Klang Valley public transport peak hour scenario the moment passengers get off the train, even before they head for immigration.

I’m already expecting some comments soon to defend KLIA on this and to tell me that I should have been a good boy and exited on the other side instead, that I’m perhaps causing trouble for KLIA, or I should have taken the shuttle bus if I were so unhappy about the Aerotrain, which I’ll repeat again that I had wanted to try it on a previous trip but it was not available. But isn’t the main and possibly only purpose of the Aerotrain to transport people between the two terminals? The shuttle buses should be just an interim solution (which takes longer than the Aerotrain ride by the way) and not touted as a “more scenic route” as I don’t think that’s what passengers are after when they wish to efficiently get from the plane to immigration and baggage reclaim.

I wouldn’t use the word improve here as the current service standards have dropped instead of being insufficient on its existing capacity. Rather, KLIA needs to actually return back the Aerotrain to it’s stated service standards of 2.5 minutes frequency during peak periods. And with 3 trains in total available, it’s actually possible to have two trains (2.5 minute frequency) to always be in operation while one is undergoing maintenance.

If two or even all three trains are breaking down so regularly, KLIA should just decide on an alternative permanent solution instead.

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Air Mauritius MK647: Kuala Lumpur to Singapore by Airbus A330-200

Mauritius is probably best known as a luxurious tropical island destination with hotels on white sandy beaches with mountainous backdrops in the middle of the Indian Ocean. I got myself a ticket on Air Mauritius from KL to a tropical island, but instead of one that’s about 9 hours away, I was headed to a neighbouring island instead on the Kuala Lumpur – Singapore – Port Louis route.

This is one of 3 Fifth Freedom Flights on the Kuala Lumpur – Singapore route. A Fifth Freedom Flight refers to a flight between two countries which are not the airline’s home country and a ticket can be purchased for this sector between the two countries.

Check-in for my flight to Mauritius Singapore was at Row L.

Not much of a queue here for check-in.

Check-in was one of the best I’ve ever had in KLIA.

I had a glass display box to bring back home and was concerned if I could carry it on board as hand baggage. Unfortunately, it had reasonably sharp edges so the check-in staff advised me to check it in, but was genuinely concerned about it breaking during the flight and asked if I wanted to go get it wrapped more just in case. (I had wrapped it with about 10 layers of newspaper on each corner already so it was quite good to go, but that was pretty thoughtful of her anyway.)

My boarding pass for my MK647 flight back to Singapore.

Heading for immigration.

The queue looks quite empty, with approximately 10-15 people in each queue. However, this process still took about 20 minutes to complete, even with each queue leading to 2 or 3 immigration counters, ie. with an average time spent of 2 to 4 minutes per passenger.

Not sure what this Customs Checkpoint is for. Feel free to pass through the body scanners with your pockets full and your filled water bottle, but place your bags in the x-ray machine where they will be supposedly screened. The security checks for boarding the plane are not done here.

Heading to the Satellite Terminal for my flight departing from Gate C17 via the Aerotrain.

The relatively spacious Aerotrain as compared with my ride the day before.

Heading off to the Satellite Terminal.

Two Aerotrains were in service this time.

The Aerotrain at the Satellite Terminal.

Heading to Gate C17.

Ooh, someone’s face seems to be missing from the panels beside the travellators.

(HINT: This guy was still here on 11 May 2018.)

Gate C17 is right at the end of the pier.

The flight was ready for boarding when I reached the gate, so it was a pretty smooth walk from security screening at the gate and straight to the plane.

The path on the right was for Economy Class passengers.

Boarding the Air Mauritius Airbus A330-200, 3B-NBL “Nénuphar”.

The interior of the the Air Mauritius Airbus A330-200.

The legroom available for my seat.

A tourism video of Mauritius was played while the plane was still at the gate. Here’s a similar video from YouTube:

Contrary to my previous flight, headsets were provided in the seat pockets. However, the entertainment system was not in the Interactive mode, so it was still kind of useless.

Once the plane was ready for departure, the cabin crew came around to close the overhead compartments. Announcements were made to welcome everyone on board, and to introduce the aircraft name of Nénuphar – water lilies – to everyone.

Pushing back from Gate C17.

The safety video was played, with scenes of Mauritius almost throughout the video. It’s probably one of the few (if not only) safety video which makes an emergency ditching look fun.

After the safety video was played, this screen showed up.

Preparing for take-off.

The plane had to wait for an incoming Cathay Dragon Airbus A330-300, which was still in the old Dragonair livery.

Glad I’m not on this ML series.

Ready for take-off at Runway 32R.

Bye Satellite Building.

Bye Main Terminal Building.

Turning left towards the Strait of Malacca.

KLIA from above.

Flying by Port Dickson.

Once the seatbelt signs were switched off, refreshments were served.

The light snack consisted of a mixed vegetable sandwich and a box of apple juice. Tasted pretty alright, and more than I expected since the previous flight had only a box of juice.

Passing by Muar.

The front Economy Class cabin was pretty full for this flight.

The back was about half empty though.

The extra legroom bulkhead seats might be useful for a long flight to Mauritius.

The rather clean washroom on board.

Nearing Singapore, the plane flew pretty high above Batam than what I’m usually used to on narrow-bodies. Not sure if it’s due to the assigned flight level or the bigger plane.

Turning back from Batam to Malaysia.

It was a little bumpy on approach to Singapore due to the rain clouds.

Landing into Changi Airport from the north-east.

Passing by Pulau Tekong.

Approaching mainland Singapore.

The partially-burnt written-off 9V-SQK sitting at Parking Bay 517L.

A Volga-Dnepr Antonov An-124 Ruslan, a rare sight in this region.

Touched down at Changi Airport.

Turning back to Terminal 1.

The new Singapore Airlines Boeing 787-10 parked at a remote stand near Terminal 1.

Turning into Gate D37.

A last look at the cabin.

Goodbye Air Mauritius.

All passengers have to disembark from the aircraft at Singapore, including transit passengers to Mauritius. However, transit passengers to Mauritius can re-enter to the gate immediately.

As for me, I’m headed out.

Goodbye MK647, leaving to Mauritius without me.

Heading down to arrival immigration and baggage reclaim.

The new refurbished Terminal 1 baggage reclaim area.

Since most people were headed for Mauritius, all bags for Singapore-bound passengers were on the belt by the time I got here.

Once past customs, it’s a walk to the new arrival hall under Jewel Changi Airport.

Overall, among all my flights on the Singapore – Kuala Lumpur sector, I have to say that Air Mauritius is to me the best airline serving on this route on all flights I have taken so far. (For the record, I have flown with Malaysia Airlines, Malindo Air, AirAsia, Jetstar Asia and Tigerair (now Scoot) so far on this route.)

For a short flight, having a wide-body to serve the route is already a bonus. On top of that, there’s the frills of a full-service airline including check-in baggage (and friendly ground staff), substantial light refreshments and even one of the most friendly cabin crew on the KL – Singapore sector.

Would I fly Air Mauritius again? If the schedules to KL fit, and I’m rushing for time, sure.

KLIA Transit + Nadi Putra 500: KLIA to Mid Valley, KL Sentral, Pasar Seni & Hab Lebuh Pudu for RM13.20* by Train + Bus

KLIA is well connected by bus and train services, though with trains costing a premium. However, if you’d like to take a train + bus combination, there is one possible method at quite an affordable price. Here, I’ll show you how to get from KLIA to the city for RM13.20 by KLIA Transit and Nadi Putra 500 highway bus.

Head down to the KLIA Transit platforms and purchase your ticket either from the counter or the ticket kiosks. If you’d like to pay by Touch ‘n Go, the ticket counter here offers free reloading services without the 50 sen service charge.

The fare from klia2/KLIA to Putrajaya & Cyberjaya costs RM9.40 regardless of payment mode.

Wait at Platform B for the KLIA Transit train service.

Check the stops of the next train before boarding the train as the platform is for bi-directional services.

Ensure that the arrow points towards KL Sentral for the next train.

Push the button to open doors.

The KLIA Transit departed KLIA at 10.52am.

Heading out of KLIA.

Passing by the palm plantations on the way out.

The KLIA Transit train makes a brief stop at Salak Tinggi.

New CRRC Changchun Equator EMUs parked outside the depot.

A KLIA Ekspres Siemens Desiro ET 425 M sitting outside.

The interior of the new KLIA Transit CRRC Changchun Equator EMU.

Arriving at Putrajaya & Cyberjaya station, with Putrajaya Sentral on the left. Get off here to change to Nadi Putra Service 500.

The train arrived at Putrajaya & Cyberjaya at 11.06am, making it a journey of 14 minutes.

The KLIA Transit train will continue on to KL Sentral, but don’t follow it all the way or it would cost you RM55.

Head upstairs to exit the station.

Once you have exited the station, turn right and continue straight to Putrajaya Sentral Bus Terminal.

Head down the first flight of stairs on the left.

Nadi Putra Service 500 is an express bus operating between Putrajaya and KL at normal city bus fares.

However, to board the bus, you have to purchase a Putra Pay card as cash is no longer accepted. Payment for all Nadi Putra bus services are by Putra Pay only. Queue here at the ticket counter to purchase a Putra Pay card for RM10 which consists of RM5 card cost and RM5 value. If you are planning to take multiple journeys, you can top up your card here first.

Once you have your card, proceed to board the bus.

Nadi Putra Service 500 departs every 30 minutes by the 00th and 30th minute of the hour.

Place the Putra Pay card on the reader and tell the driver where you would like to go. Once he has keyed in your destination, a paper ticket will be printed and given to you, thereafter your Putra Pay card will be returned to you.

The fare from Putrajaya to KL costs RM3.80 by Putra Pay only.

Despite me telling the driver than I’m heading to Mydin (ie. the local way to call Hab Lebuh Pudu – no one calls it that way), my ticket gets keyed in for KL Sentral. Guess it’s the same fare.

However, factoring the card cost, I actually pretty much paid RM10 for this bus ride since the card cost is RM5 and I can’t do anything with RM1.20 in the Putra Pay card in KL.

The interior of the Nadi Putra bus to KL.

The Nadi Putra Service 500 bus departed on time at 11.30am.

Passing by the MRT Sungai Buloh–Serdang–Putrajaya Line viaduct pillars. This would be the ideal replacement for this bus service since it would offer similar fares (I hope), provided that KLIA Transit doesn’t increase the fare for interchanging with this new MRT line like how it’s done for Bandar Tasik Selatan.

Nadi Putra Service 500 makes a small loop around the housing estates around Putrajaya Sentral before hitting the highway.

Turning on to Lebuh Sentosa.

Turning onto the Maju Expressway (MEX).

Queuing up to pay the toll.

Nadi Putra Service 500 takes the Maju Expressway just like other express buses to KLIA and klia2.

If you hit a jam, you know that you’re approaching KL.

The Nadi Putra Service 500 bus made a brief stop at Mid Valley at 12.15pm to drop off one passenger.

The Nadi Putra Service 500 bus made another stop at KL Sentral at 12.20pm outside Nu Sentral on the KL Monorail side. Surprisingly, not many passengers alighted here as I had expected.

Pasar Seni was where most passengers alighted. The bus stopped here at 12.25pm.

I moved two seats forward where the air-con was colder.

Approaching Hab Lebuh Pudu.

The Nadi Putra Service 500 bus arrived at Hab Lebuh Pudu at 12.30pm, making the bus journey from Putrajaya to this terminal in 1 hour. From KLIA, it makes this journey a total of 1 hour 38 minutes.

Information stickers around the bus on the new cashless system, a bit too late for that now.

The overall interior of the Nadi Putra bus.

From here, it’s within walking distance to Pudu Sentral, Plaza Rakyat LRT Station, Merdeka MRT Station and Masjid Jamek LRT Station.

If you are travelling in the opposite direction from Hab Lebuh Pudu to Putrajaya on Nadi Putra Service 500, get the first Nadi Putra bus in the line.

If you’re okay with getting from KLIA to the city in slightly over one and a half hours (which does happen on express buses sometimes too) but including a KLIA Transit train ride and a highway bus ride, this might give you the best combination at a fare of just RM13.20 in total, assuming you have a Putra Pay card already. (Including the cost of a new Putra Pay card, this journey would cost RM19.40 instead.)

Air Mauritius MK646: Singapore to Kuala Lumpur by Airbus A330-200

Mauritius is probably best known as a luxurious tropical island destination with hotels on white sandy beaches with mountainous backdrops in the middle of the Indian Ocean. The flag carrier of Mauritius, Air Mauritius flies non-stop between Singapore and Port Louis since 15 March 2016.

I got myself a ticket on Air Mauritius, but unfortunately, I wasn’t heading to a tropical island, but rather, a tropical peninsular north of Singapore called West Malaysia on the second leg of their Port Louis – Singapore – Kuala Lumpur route.

This is one of 3 Fifth Freedom Flights on the Singapore – Kuala Lumpur route. A Fifth Freedom Flight refers to a flight between two countries which are not the airline’s home country and a ticket can be purchased for this sector between the two countries.

MK646 departs on Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays and Sundays at 9.00am from Singapore to Kuala Lumpur. Check-in was at Terminal 1, Row 14 where there wasn’t anyone in the queue in front of me.

Check-in was rather quick, done in less than a minute since I’ve already completed my online check-in and I didn’t have any check-in bags.

Two groups of people came by after I’ve completed my check-in.

My boarding pass for my MK646 flight to Mauritius Kuala Lumpur.

Inside the transit area of Terminal 1.

As MK646 would be coming in from Port Louis and not originating from Singapore itself, I checked Flightradar24 to see where the plane was coming from and headed to the Cactus Garden to spot the arrival.

MK646 from Port Louis to Singapore touched down at Singapore Changi Airport at 8.21am, 31 minutes delayed from schedule.

The flight was operated by 3B-NBL, Air Mauritius‘s only Airbus A330-200 in operation on my date of travel. Air Mauritius has a grand total of 2 Airbus A330-200s in its fleet.

3B-NBL heading to Gate D36.

Wondering where might be the most unusual spot to take photos at such angles?

Thank you Changi Airport for the best view out of the toilet. (And for keeping it clean at all times. Thanks Uncle.)

Heading on to Gate D36 to board my flight to Kuala Lumpur.

3B-NBL “Nénuphar”, from the outdoor smoking room beside Gate D36.

The MK646 flight to KL is code-shared with Singapore Airlines and Malaysia Airlines.

3B-NBL “Nénuphar”, from the gate hold room of Gate D36.

The gate hold room of Gate D36, before all other passengers from Port Louis came in. All passengers on direct flights through Changi Airport need to disembark from the plane and go through security screening before re-boarding the plane.

What’s left of my boarding pass after entering the gate hold room.

Boarding was called after all passengers were cleared from the plane and most have gone through security screening.

There’s this different feeling before flying when boarding a wide-body plane rather than a regular short-haul narrow-body.

Heading to the plane via the aerobridge.

Stepping on board Air Mauritius for the first time.

The interior of the Air Mauritius Airbus A330-200 3B-NBL “Nénuphar”, in a 2-4-2 configuration.

The bulkheads are decorated with tropical scenes of Mauritius.

Heading to the aft cabin where my seat is.

The extra legroom seats atthe front of the cabin, which might be worth it for the flight to Mauritius.

Seat 30A would be where I am for the next hour.

The Economy Class legroom on Air Mauritius’s Airbus A330-200.

The entertainment box sticks out on both sides of each seat pair.

The view of the cabin from my seat.

The entertainment screen remains switched on from the previous flight, however, no headphones were provided on this short sector.

The entertainment system is touchscreen, with a remote control at the side of each seat.

A two-pin jack is required to plug your headphone into the entertainment system.

The row of 4 seats would make for a nice bed for an overnight flight to or from Mauritius.

Signs around the plane are in English and French.

The literature in the seat pocket are placed in a clear Air Mauritius plastic folder, which is great when I was rummaging the seat pocket for my phone and passport after landing as I didn’t have to flip through magazines to find it.

The safety video was played upon pushback.

The safety video was great, with scenes of Mauritius which I’m not going to experience even after disembarking from this plane.

Watch the full safety video here:

A Xiamen Airlines Boeing 737-800 in SkyTeam Livery. While Air Mauritius isn’t in one of the bigger airline alliances, I could use my Flying Blue (Air France/KLM) frequent flyer account to accumulate miles on Air Mauritius.

Ready to take-off.

Terminal 5 under way.

3B-NBL “Nénuphar” was the sole Air Mauritius Airbus A330-200 in operation at the time of my flight, with the other aircraft being retrofitted.

Let’s see if the new Airbus A330-900neo will replace the Airbus A330-200 on the Singapore and Kuala Lumpur routes.

While I could access the other parts of the entertainment system, I switched to the flight map throughout the flight since there weren’t any headsets provided.

A Mauritian juice box was distributed on a tray by the flight attendants on this short flight.

The mixed fruit juice was a vast mix of apple, grape, guava, passion fruit, pineapple, peach, pear, mango and orange.

A look around the washroom on board.

Moisturizer and cologne were provided in the washrooms.

The flight was rather comfortable since it was half-empty. The crew also walked around the cabin chatting with passengers, especially those who were continuing their journey from Port Louis.

Descending into Kuala Lumpur.

The flight information was rotated between English and French.

Had a little French class about what city names around the region are in French.

Passing over Port Dickson.

The very visible Lexis Hibiscus Port Dickson from above.

Approaching KLIA.

The former LCCT, now sitting empty.

Touched down at 10.11am, 11 minutes late.

Turning back to the KLIA Satellite Building.

Turning into Gate C14.

A last look at Seat 30A.

Disembarking from the aircraft.

Looking back at the Air Mauritius plane.

Outside the gate, there was a KLIA staff greeting everyone with “Welcome to Malaysia”. First time I’m experiencing this, or maybe it’s just for long-haul flights?

Heading to the Aerotrain to get to immigration and out of the airport.

Only one Aerotrain was in operation.

The other train on the outer track was under maintenance on the other platform.

The relatively crowded platform.

I had almost wanted to go downstairs to check if the shuttle bus was available, but the train pulled in just in time. Risk it to go down and check on the bus or board the train and squeeze for 2.5 minutes?

I opted to squeeze.

Wonder how long the other train will take to get back on service.

Boarding the Aerotrain to the Main Terminal Building.

It felt as though I was on the KTM Komuter to Midvalley for the 2.5 minutes I was squashed at the door.

Surviving the “Welcome to Malaysia” ride, I got off the train on my door’s side, to which I was promptly chided by a KLIA staff. More on that on a dedicated post coming soon.

Heading for immigration clearance. Luckily, as I got down fast enough, there was just one person ahead of me at the immigration counter.

Baggage reclaim was at Belt E.

The bags weren’t available yet, but luckily I had no check-in bags to wait for. There was still an estimated 6 minutes and 55 second wait for the bags, despite already having walked from the gate to the Aerotrain station, an Aerotrain ride, walking to immigration and clearing it.

Back in KL. Seems like just last week that I was here. Hmm.

Overall, among all my flights on the Singapore – Kuala Lumpur sector, I have to say that Air Mauritius is to me the best airline serving on this route on all flights I have taken so far. (For the record, I have flown with Malaysia Airlines, Malindo Air, AirAsia, Jetstar Asia and Tigerair (now Scoot) so far on this route.)

My flight was actually supposed to be 3 weeks before, but it got cancelled. However, the after sales service was great with the Singapore call centre rather responsive in picking up calls (none of those press 1 press 2 nonsense) and were very accommodating in my requests for my preferred flight change. The crew on board were also quite pleasant despite having already flown on a 7-hour flight from Port Louis just before, with one of them even asking me if I had gotten great photos of the flight after seeing me click around with my camera. And of course, being on a wide-body for a short flight is definitely a bonus.

Would I fly Air Mauritius again? If the schedules to KL fit, and I’m rushing for time, sure.

To Mauritius? Perhaps next time when I have more time and money, and the Mauritius Metro Express is completed. But with the crew as ambassadors of Mauritius, I think it would be a very warm and friendly country for a holiday.

More Fake KTM Facts by “KTM kolektif” on Singapore Memory Project (irememberSG)

Following the little exposé on the fake photo used on the Singapore Memory Project (irememberSG) portal yesterday, it seems like nothing much has been done about it yet by the Singapore Memory Project (irememberSG), so here’s two more bonus posts that I’ve discovered by the same author, KTM kolektif.


Here’s the original post reproduced from the Singapore Memory Project:

Tanjung Pagar Platform 3 HeadshuntFake KTM Photo with Standard Gauge

ADDED BY
KTM kolektif

MEMORY OF
Abdul Halim

DATE
1962

(This is an excerpt from an interview with retired KTM train operator Mr. Abdul Halim)

KTMK: Dear Mr. Halim, please tell us about yourself.

AH: I was tasked to drive the then 562.06 Kuala Terengganu in 1962. I was based at Seremban and took over from southbound drivers to continue the route down to Singapore.

I first started work at the KTM railyards when I was 18 – helping out the train engineers and earning a few cents a day. One of the engineers recognized me for my hard work and I got recommended to be sent for training as a train operator.

KTMK: Please tell us about Seremban as well as the Tanjong Pagar Railway station.

AH: Seremban is a highland area, known for very scenic views. Here is a picture taken slightly south of Rembau, as we were heading to Singapore, our final destination.

Tanjong Pagar Station is old. It was built way before my time and was the penultimate stop for all KTM trains. This is how Tanjong Pagar station looked like in the 60s, with the 562.06 rumbling in.

KTMK: What is so special about the 562.06?

AH: Because the 562.06 is a steam locomotive, it could only make one trip a day. By the 1960s it was almost at the end of its life. The train had to be coupled and uncoupled and serviced after each journey, and it was very cumbersome compared to the efficiency of the diesel locomotives.

KTMK: What else do you remember about your days as a train operator?

The trip to Singapore is about 9 hours. Typically my day starts at about 6.30am, and reached Tanjong Pagar station at 4pm. My house was at Seremban but I had a dormitory in Singapore where I will rest a night before operating the train back the next day. That way, one night I will be in my home at Seremban, the next night I will stay in Singapore. This cycle went on for about a year or two.

KTMK: Thank you Mr. Halim

(We are a group of retired train operators and together we form the group KTMK (Keratapi Tanah Melayu Kolektif). We are dedicated to preserving the memories and lives and times of ex-staff and train operators of KTM Bhd.)

Source: Singapore Memory Project

Wow.

Since this is about oral history rather than historical facts, I guess this might fit more into irememberSG, though it is indeed rather dodgy that a driver would be based in Seremban as unless he is driving the KTM Komuter in 1962, there isn’t a base for drivers there. Even if he lives in Seremban, the driver needs to get to the nearest crew base to begin his journey. Or maybe it is a base for staff of a certain “Keratapi Tanah Melayu” instead?

(P.S. There is no Berhad in KTM before 1992 as it wasn’t corporatised yet. A veteran retired train operator would definitely know that, no?)

Fun fact: The picture on the right has the locomotive running on standard gauge, which is 435mm wider than the meter gauge running in Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand, Myanmar, Cambodia and Laos. Checkmate.


Here’s the other original post reproduced from the Singapore Memory Project:

Fake KTM Photo Red Loco

ADDED BY
KTM kolektif

MEMORY OF
KTM Kolektif

DATE
1963

In the spirit of the Lunar New Year, we would like to share an image from our archives “refurbishing the 565.26 Tanah Rata”. Black and red have been the common colours of railroad industries since time immemorial. It is our understanding, however, that certain KTM locomotives were repainted with a coat of red paint once every two to three years to usher in the New Year.

In the following interview with Mr. Mohamed Azri, he shares with us what its like to work as a railyard supervisor in Tanjong Pagar Railyard.

KTMK: Mr. Azri, can you tell us about your work as a railyard supervisor?

Mr. Azri: I was working at the Tanjong Pagar Railyard from 1950-1963. I was a railyard supervisor. It was quite busy as compared to the other railyards in Malaysia which I worked at when I returned home, because it was in Singapore, and near the Borneo Wharves. There would be cargo coming in everyday. So everyday there was work.

KTMK: You supervised the repairing and refurbishing of trains?

Mr. Azri: Locomotive engines. I supervise refurbishing locomotive engines. They need a lot of repair and servicing because they are old – oiling, lubricating, cleaning of the steam moving parts.

KTMK: Were the locomotive engines painted red? Did you paint them? Can you tell us more about this photograph?

Mr. Azri: Not all KTM locomotives were painted red. Some were black. Yes I supervised them while they were being painted at Tanjong Pagar railyard. Usually only the locomotives that come to Singapore they would paint red. I think its because there are a lot of Chinese in Singapore. To Chinese, red means prosperity and maybe they painted the engine red to appeal to Chinese commuters.

KTMK: Thank you Mr. Azri. We would like to wish each and every one of our readers a Happy Lunar New Year.

There are more pictures of beautifully red coloured locomotives here: http://searail.mymalaya.com/Sing1977C/index.html

(We are a group of retired train operators and together we form the group KTMK (Keratapi Tanah Melayu Kolektif). We are dedicated to preserving the memories and lives and times of ex-staff and train operators of KTM Bhd.)

Source: Singapore Memory Project

Look at that disgusting photoshop job of the red loco. 

Just like the post yesterday, this edited photo is an insult to the great Class 56 (also known as Class O) Locomotive which is a 4-6-2 locomotive operating with a tender, and most certainly not that light steam locomotive as shown in the photo. A total of only 66 Class 56 locomotives in 4 batches were procured, and not the supposed 5 as happily stated in the supposed interview (565.26 Tanah Rata) (And even being the 26th locomotive in the fifth batch? KTM isn’t operating trains with 2-minute frequencies across Peninsular Malaysia. And with “568.14” seen yesterday, KTM must be panicking to install a CBTC system in 1962 to cope with their immense efficiency.). To add to the same joke, the author/editor uses the same modern blue and yellow Keris logo of KTM on the locomotive’s side as the initial photo seen yesterday. The red paint and the painting guy also looks haphazardly photoshopped on, otherwise, the person painting must be either a kid or a midget.

Also, the poster “KTM kolektif” continues to abbreviate KTM as “Keratapi Tanah Melayu”, even including the Berhad in 1962.

What is it with “KTM kolektif” and his penchant for the year 1962?

Fun fact: There is no FMSR/MR/KTM locomotive which bears the name of “Tanah Rata”.

Fun fact 2: The maroon (not red) livery was a regular livery which started with the 20 Class diesel locomotive. There were no red steam locomotives ever in existence, though there were green and blue ones.

Actually, I don’t even need a nail in the coffin point here because the whole photo reeks of obvious edits.


With no action taken yet by the Singapore Memory Project (irememberSG), a Singapore Government initiative and project managed by the National Library Board, Singapore, I guess this means that it’s okay for these fake news to be spread by unknown posters on the portal, providing for false history and recollections to be taken as truth for generations to come.

It is also not known who the poster “KTM kolektif” is, or his or her purpose in spreading these fake photos and potentially false information. Many people suddenly came to “love” the railway in Singapore only after the shock announcement about the land swap deal sealed in 2010, and these posts reek of the similar tone that many of these people are preaching to others about the railway that they suddenly knew about.

It would be a sad day for the railway history of Singapore if these facts were taken as actual accounts, altering the meaning of certain aspects of the railway forever.

Inaccurate Historical KTM Facts on Singapore Memory Project (irememberSG)

A post from the Singapore Memory Project (irememberSG) about the KTM history in Singapore has been making rounds on my WhatsApp (not sure if other railway fans have already got it), but it is a memory about a supposed “KTM day” with a grossly inaccurate fact about the date of the closure of the railway in Singapore.


Here’s the original post reproduced from the Singapore Memory Project:

Poorly Photoshoppped Photo for Fake News

ADDED BY
KTM kolektif

MEMORY OF
KTM kolektif

DATE
30/06/1962

These are our pioneer train drivers, senior drivers with more than 30 years experience since the 1930s, who have driven various steam locomotives on regular trips between Negeri Sembilan and Tanjong Pagar Station.

On 30th June 1959, The KTM union in Negeri Sembilan decided to designate that day as KTM day. It was a day when the junior train drivers and friends of KTM would celebrate their appreciation to the senior train drivers by giving them garlands and throwing a small party.

Eventually, staff in other stations in the Southern states and even Tanjong Pagar station began celebrating KTM day.

The governments of Singapore and Malaysia honoured and recognized KTM day by tying in the closing ceremony with the last day of train services to the station on 30th June 2011.

This photograph was taken on KTM day in Tanjong Pagar Station, 1962.

Source: Singapore Memory Project


Wow, where do I even begin.

Since I am unable to comment much if “KTM day” is a real event or not, I will avoid this point. However, in case there was a mix-up of the meaning of the day, KTM did celebrate its 125th Anniversary on 1 June 2010, possibly with the meaning of “KTM day”, so there’s that.

(If there are members from RUM, perhaps you could help chip in for the above part on the annual “KTM day” if it exists.)

Let’s start with the article first.

These are our pioneer train drivers, senior drivers with more than 30 years experience since the 1930s, who have driven various steam locomotives on regular trips between Negeri Sembilan and Tanjong Pagar Station.

Trains operated between Singapore up to Penang. However, giving the article the benefit of doubt, this could be referring only to Gemas Crew and Singapore Crew.

The governments of Singapore and Malaysia honoured and recognized KTM day by tying in the closing ceremony with the last day of train services to the station on 30th June 2011.

This is possibly the triggering paragraph for me to write this post. All dates in the Malaysia–Singapore Points of Agreement Supplement 2010 states that the closure of the railway is “by 1 July 2011” and not “on 30 June 2011” as suggested by the author. This means that the railway could close any time between the announcement and 1 July 2011, not necessarily to be on the last possible day on 30 June 2011 itself. This also means that there was no consideration for the closure to be held on a supposed “KTM day” since there is a range of dates provided. Also, most KTM staff did not receive the shocking first news of the closure of the railway from internal circulars before the official announcement but rather from the same news that you and I saw on TV, newspapers and other media – which also means that the closure of the railway might not even have been consulted with KTM beforehand, let alone to have it commemorated on a supposed “KTM day”.

Now, let’s get to that incriminating photo used by the Singapore Memory Project.

Poorly Photoshoppped Photo for Fake News

Here it is again for easier referencing. Let’s start from left to right.

On first look, the photo already looks weird to me. Partly because most old photos have already been seen by members of the Malayan Railway Fan Club and are easily recognizable. This is a new photo that probably none of us have seen before, for good reason.

The author, KTM kolektif, claims that “This photograph was taken on KTM day in Tanjong Pagar Station, 1962.”. From top left to bottom right…

Original Photo 1: Hill

Not sure where that came from.

Original Photo 2: Tanjung Pagar Railway Station

The AYE viaduct pillar is visible (sufficient nail in the coffin since the AYE only came about in 1988), supposedly supporting the weight of the hill. The photo is also flipped digitally with the station sign flipped back so that the letters SIN with a little part of G still reads correctly. However, the blue coloured sign with the words SINGAPURA on it is actually an ADDITIONAL PLATE in front of the original sign, not yet installed in 1962. The original SINGAPURA station sign at the end of the platform is in the original black and white format similar to every other station in Malaysia at that time. It also potentially consists of the languages of Malay/English (Singapura), Jawi, Tamil and Mandarin, but I am unable to verify it physically as that would constitute as vandalism.

Original Photo 3: Supposed Class 56 Locomotive

The photo is an insult to the great Class 56 (also known as Class O) Locomotive which is a 4-6-2 locomotive operating with a tender, and most certainly not that light steam locomotive as shown in the photo. A total of only 66 Class 56 locomotives in 4 batches were procured, and not the supposed 8 as edited happily in the photo (568.14) (And even being the 14th locomotive in the eighth batch? KTM isn’t operating trains with 2-minute frequencies across Peninsular Malaysia.). To add to the joke, the author/editor uses the modern blue and yellow Keris logo of KTM on the locomotive’s side. This modern logo has only been used since 1992. If the author/editor would like the edit to be more believable, he or she should at least use the old orange Keris logo which coincidentally started being in use since 1962. But of course, to be really accurate, the Class 56 locomotives either only ever bore the legendary FMSR crest on her tender, or none at all.

Original Photo 4: KTM Staff in Blue Uniform

Again, another joke. The blue uniform was only launched with, if not after, the corporate change to the modern blue and yellow Keris logo in 1992. In 1962, the classic beige uniforms were used. The photo was supposedly taken “in Tanjong Pagar Station”, however, the staff is holding a token pouch, which is only issued or returned at the Tanjung Pagar Signal Cabin. If it’s still present with the staff when the train reaches the station, somebody gonna get a hurt real bad…

Original Photo 5: Track with Curve

Didn’t bother much with CSI-ing on this photo, but it makes the platform shelter of the opposite platform end abruptly like a bus stop, and effectively does not provide for a shelter on the side of the supposed platform where the supposed photoshopped staff are standing on.

With so much discrepancies with the hastily-edited photo, would I be able to trust that there is a “KTM day” in existence? Whenever I make personal train trips on 30 June or 1 July, the staff would say things on the lines of missing the times on the Singapore railway rather than being appreciated for their hard work. 30 June 2011 is more significant to all of us as the sad last day of the Singapore railway rather than the total joyous opposite of a supposed “KTM day”.


The Singapore Memory Project, a Singapore Government initiative and project managed by the National Library Board, is I would say similar to a collection of oral history passed down by word of mouth for future generations to understand what Singapore used to be through individual experiences. However, with such approvals for inaccurate snippets involving information that can be easily Googled by moderators (not necessarily needing to have a great interest in trains, though it helps when typing down facts for this article and finding references later – don’t do that in school, kids), it is a wonder if the Singapore Memory Project does plan to keep an accurate account of oral history or not.

I do not know about the process of getting memories like this approved on the Singapore Memory Project‘s portal, but if considering that such inaccurate information can easily be approved and be made publicly, it is a wonder why when a Singapore Memory Project representative called me up for an interview in 2013, my oral account of my experience (not historical facts) on the railway in Singapore during the interview still has not been uploaded till today. (It’s not the interviewer’s fault – there were forms for me to sign so I’m pretty sure all those were submitted.)

The Singapore Memory Project and the National Library Board should buck up on approving such “memories”, ensuring that known historical facts (I don’t mean personal experiences) are accurate, if not, a portal for submitting stories like this is no different than just another citizen journalism website.

Or, if you really want to know what I feel about the above photo, scroll back up and Right Click > Save image as… to see the file name.

Additional external references (so that you know I’m not creating facts from my own self) from mapetm’s and Malcolm Wilton-Jones’s excellent websites, both of whom are members of the Malayan Railway Fan Club (PPM-011-10-0302014).

KLIA Transit: klia2 to Bandar Tasik Selatan by New CRRC Changchun Equator EMU

The KLIA Transit is a commuter rail service operated by Express Rail Link running between klia2 and KL Sentral, serving all stations in between including KLIA, Salak Tinggi, Putrajaya & Cyberjaya and Bandar Tasik Selatan.

On 13 March 2018, the second generation of trains on the Express Rail Link, the CRRC Changchun Equator EMU, were launched on both KLIA Ekspres and KLIA Transit services, increasing the frequency of KLIA Transit services from 20 minutes to 15 minutes during weekday peak hours. 4 sets of KLIA Transit Equator EMUs and 2 sets of KLIA Ekspres Equator EMUs were ordered in total. The name Equator EMU is inspired by the fact that “Kuala Lumpur, the capital of Malaysia, is located near the equator”.

The train arrived at 11.42am for the 11.48am departure to KL Sentral.

Don’t fret if the doors close quickly on you – push the button to open the train doors.

Departing from klia2.

9M-AQB on the taxiway, featuring the General Electric (GE) Livery with a locomotive on the starboard side.

Most passengers got off at KLIA.

Heading onwards to the city.

Making a brief stop at Salak Tinggi.

Making a brief stop at Putrajaya & Cyberjaya.

The MRT Sungai Buloh–Serdang–Putrajaya Line‘s viaducts seems to be intruding into the projected Putrajaya Monorail‘s alignment. I guess this means that the Putrajaya Monorail is an abandoned project forever.

Passing by Serdang KTM Komuter Station.

Running parallel with the KTM line and the Sungai Besi Expressway.

Approaching Bandar Tasik Selatan.

The KLIA Transit CRRC Changchun Equator EMU at Bandar Tasik Selatan.

The KLIA Transit CRRC Changchun Equator EMU departing Bandar Tasik Selatan.

I did not have high expectations of this train, but overall, I would say based on passenger comfort, the new KLIA Transit CRRC Changchun Equator EMU is similar to if not on par with the existing Siemens Desiro ET 425 M EMU. The ride was smooth and quiet, the seats were sufficiently comfortable and the TV and announcement sound quality was good.

If there’s one criticism, I would say that the seat would get easily dirty (and some already are) with the plain, light coloured fabric as compared with the patterned design on the KLIA Ekspres Siemens Desiro ET 425 M EMU.

But nonetheless, a good product. Hopefully, with these additional 4 trains, KLIA Transit services can be increased to perhaps 10 to 15 minutes throughout the day for added convenience when travelling to Putrajaya and KLIA as the low 30-minute frequency timetables wouldn’t have to be memorized anymore (or maybe it’s just me who’s memorizing it).

KLIA Transit: klia2 to KLIA by New CRRC Changchun Equator EMU

The KLIA Transit is a commuter rail service operated by Express Rail Link running between KL Sentral and klia2, serving all stations in between including Bandar Tasik Selatan, Putrajaya & Cyberjaya, Salak Tinggi and KLIA.

The KLIA Transit service can also be used as an inter-terminal transfer between klia2 and KLIA at a nominal fare of RM2.

On 13 March 2018, the second generation of trains on the Express Rail Link, the CRRC Changchun Equator EMU, were launched on both KLIA Ekspres and KLIA Transit services, increasing the frequency of KLIA Transit services from 20 minutes to 15 minutes during weekday peak hours. 4 sets of KLIA Transit Equator EMUs and 2 sets of KLIA Ekspres Equator EMUs were ordered in total. The name Equator EMU is inspired by the fact that “Kuala Lumpur, the capital of Malaysia, is located near the equator”.

The new CRRC Changchun Equator EMU has a longer seat pitch (I don’t actually feel so.) and a higher ceiling according to the promotional video on board the new CRRC Changchun Equator EMU.

Departing from klia2. The journey from klia2 to KLIA takes 3 minutes.

The overall interior of the CRRC Changchun Equator EMU.

KLIA’s air-conditioned platforms operate with platform screen doors. Once the platform screen doors open, push the train’s door button to open the train doors.

The train will continue to KL Sentral, stated on the LED destination sign as KLS.

Hopefully, with these additional trains, KLIA Transit services can be increased to perhaps 10 to 15 minutes throughout the day for added convenience when travelling between klia2 and KLIA as during periods where the KLIA Transit and KLIA Ekspres timetables do not match well, the transfer frequency between the two terminals can be up to 18 minutes – not something desirable when passengers are rushing to check-in for their next flight.

KLIA Transit: KL Sentral to klia2 by New CRRC Changchun Equator EMU

The KLIA Transit is a commuter rail service operated by Express Rail Link running between KL Sentral and klia2, serving all stations in between including Bandar Tasik Selatan, Putrajaya & Cyberjaya, Salak Tinggi and KLIA.

On 13 March 2018, the second generation of trains on the Express Rail Link, the CRRC Changchun Equator EMU, were launched on both KLIA Ekspres and KLIA Transit services, increasing the frequency of KLIA Transit services from 20 minutes to 15 minutes during weekday peak hours. 4 sets of KLIA Transit Equator EMUs and 2 sets of KLIA Ekspres Equator EMUs were ordered in total. The name Equator EMU is inspired by the fact that “Kuala Lumpur, the capital of Malaysia, is located near the equator”.

The new Equator EMUs are nowadays only seen on KLIA Transit services, possibly due to the fact that the two sets for KLIA Ekspres services do not have luggage compartments, restricting the capacity of the In-Town Check-In service at KL Sentral.

The overall interior of the new KLIA Transit CRRC Changchun Equator EMU.

The new KLIA Transit CRRC Changchun Equator EMU offers a rather comfortable standing space with three-way grab poles and hand grips in the middle along with handles on the side of each individual seat as compared with the Siemens Desiro ET 425 M first-generation EMUs with stanchion poles in front of handles on each individual seat. Also, the single seats face evenly in both directions in a single area as compared with the Siemens Desiro ET 425 M EMU.

The new hand grips installed on the middle grab bar row.

The door on the new CRRC Changchun Equator EMU is reminiscent of the Siemens Desiro ET 425 M counterpart.

The door operation and button design is also almost exactly the same as the Siemens Desiro ET 425 M EMU.

The route map of the KLIA Transit route on the new CRRC Changchun Equator EMU.

The pair seats can be found at the ends of each coach.

No more HSR to Singapore for now, but it seems that the TRX Signature Tower The Exchange 106 (oops, name change) still stands.

Each alternate pair seat has a 3-pin power socket located below the seat.

The single seats in the middle of the car.

The overall interior of the new KLIA Transit CRRC Changchun Equator EMU.

The CRRC Changchun builder plate is located at the gangway.

The information screens on the CRRC Changchun Equator EMUs are bigger than the Siemens Desiro ones.

The centralized position also offers a good view for all passengers, standing or sitting anywhere on the train.

Making a brief stop at Putrajaya & Cyberjaya.

Passing by the Express Rail Link Depot at Salak Tinggi.

Two KLIA Ekspres CRRC Changchun Equator EMUs were resting in the depot, one inside the workshop and one outside, which means there were no new KLIA Ekspres CRRC Changchun Equator EMU running on the day of my visit.

Two KLIA Transit CRRC Changchun Equator EMUs were resting in the depot, parked outside. The KLIA Transit service was formed of two KLIA Ekspres CRRC Changchun Equator EMUs and one Siemens Desiro ET 425 M EMU on the day of my visit.

Approaching KLIA.

The refraction on the new glass windows on the CRRC Changchun Equator EMU does not make for good shots when taken from the side.

Passing by the old KLIA Transit platforms at KLIA when trains used to terminate here.

Making a brief stop at KLIA.

A significant number of inter-terminal transferring passengers boarded the train at KLIA to get to klia2.

Approaching klia2.

Arrived at klia2 with the new KLIA Transit CRRC Changchun Equator EMU.

The train’s destination will be stated on the exterior LED destination sign.

I did not have high expectations of this train, but overall, I would say based on passenger comfort, the new KLIA Transit CRRC Changchun Equator EMU is similar to if not on par with the existing Siemens Desiro ET 425 M EMU. The ride was smooth and quiet, the seats were sufficiently comfortable and the TV and announcement sound quality was good.

If there’s one criticism, I would say that the seat would get easily dirty (and some already are) with the plain, light coloured fabric as compared with the patterned design on the KLIA Ekspres Siemens Desiro ET 425 M EMU.

But nonetheless, a good product. Hopefully, with these additional 4 trains, KLIA Transit services can be increased to perhaps 10 to 15 minutes throughout the day for added convenience when travelling to Putrajaya and KLIA as the low 30-minute frequency timetables wouldn’t have to be memorized anymore (or maybe it’s just me who’s memorizing it).

SkyPark Link 2806up: Terminal SkyPark (Subang Airport/SkyPark Terminal/LTSAAS) to KL Sentral by Train

The SkyPark Link is Malaysia’s second airport rail link, providing an express service between KL Sentral and Subang SkyPark through the new Terminal SkyPark station. This new limited-stop service only makes one stop at Subang Jaya, before taking the new branch line to Terminal SkyPark.

Collect your FREE token to get on the SkyPark Link.

Tickets are FREE of charge from 1 May 2018 to 30 June 2018.

Once the actual fares are introduced, KTM may charge the following with a 50% discount for OKUs, Senior Citizens, Children between 2-6 years old and Students:

  • KL Sentral – Terminal SkyPark: RM15
  • KL Sentral – Subang Jaya: RM10
  • Subang Jaya – Terminal SkyPark: RM5

Source: MOT Facebook

Remember to check the platform number before heading up as there are two separate side platforms and trains may depart from both platforms.

Head up to the correct platform to board the train.

EMU29 operated on my train to KL Sentral.

The interior of EMU29. EMU29 features longitudinal seating with no SkyPark Link interior decals.

The old advertising hand grips are removed on the two SkyPark Link sets with longitudinal seating, leaving just a horizontal grab pole. Be careful when grabbing onto it as the former hand grip positioning locks may be sharp.

The Priority Zone on EMU29 with the old 83 Class seats in tact and minimal information decals pasted around.

Departing from Terminal SkyPark.

Approaching the original Subang Airport alignment.

The old track bed to the former Subang Airport Railway Station can still be seen at the point where both alignments meet.

Approaching the Pelabuhan Klang branch line.

Approaching Subang Jaya.

EMU33 was resting at Subang Jaya‘s main down line, probably as a standby set for the SkyPark Link.

Passing by Subang Ria Recreational Park.

Approaching the future Eco City station.

The Eco City station looks pretty ready to accept passengers. I hope this can open as soon as possible even if it’s before the actual Eco City completion as this will open up a new connecting station with the Kelana Jaya Line at the adjacent Abdullah Hukum LRT Station.

Heading to KL Sentral with the bypass to the south splitting away.

Merging back with the main line at Simpang Pelabuhan Klang.

The train arrived at Platform 4, with lots of passengers bound for Batu Caves immediately rushing into the train. Seeing that no announcements were made that the train is not bound for Batu Caves, I decided to take it upon myself to let everyone in the middle coach know, and yes, all of them disembarked, with not a single person actually heading for Terminal SkyPark.

KTM should have made announcements at the platform prior to the arrival of this train at the wrong platform and not expect everyone to know that this train is only bound for Terminal SkyPark just because of its different livery and small destination sign.

Again, the SkyPark Link is a commendable project but the way its designed and operated gives off the feeling of having the project just because. The line uses existing infrastructure at all portions from track to train to ticket except for the new railway alignment of Terminal SkyPark branch, and while I do not support KTM’s never ending free rides as mentioned before, it’s going to be hard in the months or even years to come to build up the premium image that the SkyPark Link deserves.