Retracing The Old Sentosa Monorail Stations In 2020 – RailTravel Station’s 1000th Article!

Retracing The Old Sentosa Monorail Stations In 2020

The old Sentosa Monorail was a leisure monorail system on the island operating in a uni-directional look around the western parts of the island, which were the only parts with attractions and facilities at that time. It operated for 23 years from 23 February 1982 to 16 March 2005. The line first operated in a clockwise direction, later changing to an anti-clockwise direction most likely some time after the opening of Underwater World station.

For the 1000th article on RailTravel Station, since I can’t travel to any other country to commemorate it, I decided to trace the stations on one of my most favourite train lines ever, with all the announcements that I still remember playing in my head while on the trip.

Station 1: Ferry Terminal Station

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 1 Ferry Terminal Station 001

Despite being the main boarding station that most people would use, Ferry Terminal Station was actually opened 5 years later than the rest of the line due to its construction during that time. The monorail tracks ran through the middle of the building, making it the biggest Sentosa Monorail station on the line.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 1 Ferry Terminal Station 002

The Sentosa Ferry Terminal was seated at the front of the Fountain Gardens which linked back to Kiki’s home at the Musical Fountain and Merlion Walk, forming a central path for easy navigation. Today, the strip is still evident in Resorts World Sentosa, and the Sentosa Ferry Terminal was seated at the current Waterfront and Crane Dance.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 1 Ferry Terminal Station 004

This should be where the staircase up to the monorail platform was.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 1 Ferry Terminal Station 005

I used to take the ferry back to mainland Singapore to World Trade Centre from here.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 1 Ferry Terminal Station 006

The view out to Fountain Gardens, Merlion Walk and Merlion is hard to see today, but still identifiable.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 1 Ferry Terminal Station 007

The path still exists to Imbiah Station, though on different terrain levels now with Resorts World Sentosa being built on and around it.

Station 2: Underwater World Station

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 2 Underwater World Station 009

The original road network at the former Underwater World remains, now known as Siloso Point.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 2 Underwater World Station 001

The site behind the Siloso Point bus stop is now, however, hoarded up.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 2 Underwater World Station 006

When walking behind towards Fort Siloso, I found that not the entire site is hoarded up after all, but just the front part.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 2 Underwater World Station 007

The rear part where Underwater World used to be has been turned into the Stacks Car Park.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 2 Underwater World Station 002

The car park gives me a rather temporary feel as it has no structures as compared to Beach Station.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 2 Underwater World Station 004

My gut feel says that this is where the tracks used to run over my head, facing the station building. The station building was redeveloped to house an interactive stingray feeding pool, a display of small marine reef species, and a fish reflexology spa following the closure of the monorail system.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 2 Underwater World Station 005

What I think is the view of the monorail station and Underwater World itself.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 2 Underwater World Station 008

The former Fort Siloso Tour tram stop opposite Underwater World still remains, functioning as a shelter.

Station 3: Fort Siloso Station

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 3 Fort Siloso Station 001

With no more Sentosa Monorail and Fort Siloso Tour tram, the only way to Fort Siloso is now only by foot via the usual access road or the new Fort Siloso Skywalk.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 3 Fort Siloso Station 002

Fort Siloso Station was the first to close on the system to redevelop it into the Surrender Chambers exhibit, formerly located at Imbiah Lookout where Madame Tussauds Singapore is now housed.

Trains still bypassed the station at speed during the redevelopment. Subsequent monorail station numbers were then reduced by 1, which was shortlived anyway since the system was going to close down. For the purpose of clarity for this article, I will not include the renumbered station numbers for the subsequent stations.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 3 Fort Siloso Station 003

Out of all the station buildings, Fort Siloso’s fittings seem to be the most in tact.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 3 Fort Siloso Station 004

Fort Siloso was one of 3 stations on the network with only a single side platform. It also had perpetual queues that weren’t moving with tour groups mainly moving from Underwater World to Cable Car station, with no one alighting at Fort Siloso.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 3 Fort Siloso Station 005

The tiles on the stairs up to the former platform (now Surrender Chambers) are still of the original tactile flooring.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 3 Fort Siloso Station 006

Oops.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 3 Fort Siloso Station 011

Oops x 2.

The entrance is regulared by a staff member who checks your SafeEntry check-in and temperature, and limits the number of people inside.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 3 Fort Siloso Station 008

Many have the misconception that the boardwalk is the monorail’s approach into the station, which is not true. Fort Siloso Station was on a balloon loop and trains approached the station on a left horseshoe curve.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 3 Fort Siloso Station 009

I peeked my camera out to simulate looking out from the platform, and was very pleased with what I accidentally captured.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 3 Fort Siloso Station 010

The original “PLEASE WAIT BEHIND YELLOW LINE” wordings on the platform remains till this day.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 3 Fort Siloso Station 013

The Surrender Chambers at Fort Siloso focuses on two surrenders: the British to the Japanese in 1942 and  the Japanese to the Allies in 1945. The first when you enter is the British surrender and the timeline leading to it.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 3 Fort Siloso Station 014

The paths that the Japanese took to capture Singapore.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 3 Fort Siloso Station 015Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 3 Fort Siloso Station 016

Wax sculptures depict the surrender of Singapore by Lieutenant-General Percival to General Yamashita at the Ford Factory at Bukit Timah.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 3 Fort Siloso Station 012

The exhibit then transitions into an informative path on life in Singapore (Syonan-to) under the Japanese Occupation.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 3 Fort Siloso Station 017Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 3 Fort Siloso Station 018

The exhibit then moves to wax sculptures depicting the Japanese surrender ceremony at the Municipal Building of Singapore (now known as City Hall / National Gallery Singapore), signed by Lord Louis Mountbatten and General Seishiro Itagaki. This signing also ended the Japanese Occupation of Southeast Asia.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 3 Fort Siloso Station 028

The exhibition ends with information on the post-WWII conflicts around Asia.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 3 Fort Siloso Station 021Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 3 Fort Siloso Station 022

I was quite surprised that Sentosa took their monorail heritage pretty seriously and described it in the Fort Siloso development timeline.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 3 Fort Siloso Station 023

Cards that flip to view the development of Fort Siloso also includes the Sentosa Monorail.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 3 Fort Siloso Station 024

The Fort Siloso Tour trams were also not left out of history, though they only had shots of the new ones and not the classic black locomotive and 2 coaches. You can still find these “trams” in a refreshed livery operating on the Beach Tram.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 3 Fort Siloso Station 025

The Sentosa Monorail at Fort Siloso Station when it first opened travelling a clockwise direction.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 3 Fort Siloso Station 026

The Sentosa Monorail at Fort Siloso Station in the 1990s when it travelled an anti-clockwise direction.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 3 Fort Siloso Station 027

How I miss this balloon loop with a speeding driver if lucky.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 3 Fort Siloso Station 029

Heading down from the platform Surrender Chambers.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 3 Fort Siloso Station 030

Replicas of recruitment posters line the walls of the staircase heading down.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 3 Fort Siloso Station 031

The Surrender Chambers is meant to function as a one-way walkthrough.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 3 Fort Siloso Station 032

The rear of the monorail station blends well with the magazine storage just behind it.

Station 4: Cable Car Station

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 4 Cable Car Station 001

Cable Car Station, as the name implies, offers an interchange with the Singapore Cable Car. The whole area was also known more as Cable Car Station or Mount Imbiah before the rebranded name of Imbiah Lookout came about.

Klook.com

Today, Cable Car Station functions as the Sentosa Nature Discovery.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 4 Cable Car Station 002

Do take note of the opening hours.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 4 Cable Car Station 003

The elevated entrance to Sentosa Nature Discovery.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 4 Cable Car Station 004

The entrance for the Sentosa Monorail used to be on the ground level.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 4 Cable Car Station 005Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 4 Cable Car Station 007

The Sentosa Nature Discovery gallery introduces the natural habits around Sentosa, not only around this Imbiah area.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 4 Cable Car Station 006

Standing on the former gap for the monorail tracks looking towards Fort Siloso Station.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 4 Cable Car Station 008

The staircase to exit the station.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 4 Cable Car Station 009

Standing on the former gap for the monorail tracks looking towards Palawan Beach Station.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 4 Cable Car Station 010Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 4 Cable Car Station 011

The Imbiah Trail Boardwalk leads on after the Sentosa Nature Discovery gallery, built on top of the old Sentosa Monorail tracks.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 4 Cable Car Station 014Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 4 Cable Car Station 013

Again, very pleased that Sentosa preserved the Sentosa Monorail history in the redeveloped attraction with an information board on it.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 4 Cable Car Station 015

The view of the monorail tracks travelling through the forest.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 4 Cable Car Station 016

The view out of Cable Car Station towards Palawan Beach Station as the monorail skirts around the Merlion with a view of Fountain Gardens.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 4 Cable Car Station 017

Hmm, the years seem messed up though.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 4 Cable Car Station 018

I miss this approach.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 4 Cable Car Station 019

Heading on the boardwalk to Imbiah Trail.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 4 Cable Car Station 020

A good directional map on the boardwalk featuring a walking duration radius.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 4 Cable Car Station 021Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 4 Cable Car Station 022Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 4 Cable Car Station 023

The junction at the end has a shelter with some benches and another directional map.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 4 Cable Car Station 024Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 4 Cable Car Station 025Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 4 Cable Car Station 026

The monorail tracks at the end through the forest has not been removed. Perfect.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 4 Cable Car Station 027

Heading down the stairs from the boardwalk.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 4 Cable Car Station 028

The shelter is supported by additional concrete and steel, working around the old monorail tracks.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 4 Cable Car Station 029

The track can support the rest of the boardwalk normally though.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 4 Cable Car Station 030Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 4 Cable Car Station 031

A part of the tracks have been cut off though I’m not sure of the reason since it’s just a bicycle track below.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 4 Cable Car Station 032Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 4 Cable Car Station 033Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 4 Cable Car Station 034

The monorail tracks through the forest.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 4 Cable Car Station 035Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 4 Cable Car Station 036

The part of the track that supports the boardwalk has been repainted grey, while the remainder remains originally green.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 4 Cable Car Station 037

The ramp portion of the boardwalk splitting off from the monorail alignment is supported on its own new concrete and steel pillars.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 4 Cable Car Station 039

Looking at the old monorail tracks / boardwalk across Imbiah Road.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 4 Cable Car Station 038

The Imbiah Lookout bus stop and cable car station (Sentosa Line) is located near this end of the boardwalk.

Klook.com

Station 5: Palawan Beach Station

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 5 Palawan Beach Station 001

Palawan Beach Station was a breath of fresh air (literally sea breeze) after touring the forest ever since Ferry Terminal Station, where the line heads out to the sea side.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 5 Palawan Beach Station 002

The station building was renovated and converted to shop lots and food outlets following the closure of the monorail line.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 5 Palawan Beach Station 003

Unfortunately, the building has been hoarded up now, and it will probably be either demolished or developed again. Let’s hope it’s the latter, though I don’t have confidence with the many redevelopments on Palawan Beach.

Station 6: Ficus Station

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 6 Ficus Station 002

Ficus, or SDC Office, didn’t really lead to key attractions during the Sentosa Monorail’s operation since it was way before the era of Sentosa Cove and those that go to Sentosa Golf Club or Beaufort Hotel wouldn’t be walking from here.

Today, it looks like it’s still in the middle of nowhere.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 6 Ficus Station 001

The bus stop at Ficus along Allanbrooke Road still features the classic Sentosa design of things back then.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 6 Ficus Station 003

The station building of Ficus Station.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 6 Ficus Station 004Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 6 Ficus Station 005

The station functioned as a restaurant and bar before, but now sits idle with trees growing steadily around it.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 6 Ficus Station 006

The EtonHouse bus stop outside the former Ficus Station. Sentosa Pavilion, Opp Sentosa Pavilion, Opp So Spa, So Spa and EtonHouse form a cluster of interchange bus stops around major junctions. In theory, you might be able to save travel time by changing buses on the faster branch, but the low frequency of Bus B removes that opportunity.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 6 Ficus Station 007

The closed former station building of Ficus Station with no function for now.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 6 Ficus Station 008

Happy to see the peacocks still roaming freely here free from harassment by tourists just like everywhere in the old Sentosa.

Station 7: Visitor Arrival Centre Station

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 7 Visitor Arrival Centre Station 001

Finally, the last station on the loop, Visitor Arrival Centre Station.

Yes, this photo looks weird and not sequential because my trip wasn’t – I went for my “tour” based on logical and immediate connections rather than the actual loop in order to save overall time. I had actually took SBS Transit Bus Service 123 into Sentosa so that I would have an upper deck front view so I needn’t walk to the nothingness of the former site of Visitor Arrival Centre Station.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 7 Visitor Arrival Centre Station 002

Most likely driving through the former Visitor Arrival Centre Station building with the realigned Sentosa Gateway and Gateway Avenue angled and towards the east.

Retracing Old Sentosa Monorail 2020 Station 7 Visitor Arrival Centre Station 003

The road on the former site of Visitor Arrival Centre Station building leads down to Resorts World Sentosa (RWS).

Overall, a good trip around Sentosa visiting both the old parts still extremely recognisable at Fort Siloso and Ficus, while useful new developments at Ferry Terminal makes the replacement worth it to me despite the closure of the monorail system. Progress like this is what makes sacrifice of train lines worth it in my opinion.

A picture paints a thousand words, but here’s a thousand articles filled with lots of words and pictures completed!

If you have stuck with me since the beginning, thank you for sticking for a thousand articles so far – not something I expected I could do when I first started this little website 6 years ago. To everyone, I hope you will enjoy the next thousand too.

4 comments

    1. The monorail depot was between Ficus and Visitor Arrival Centre. The depot site still houses the various buses and trams today.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.